Coprinellus micaceus (Bull.) Vilgalys, Hopple & Jacq. Johnson

This species is accepted, and is found in Europe, South America, North America, Australia and China. It is used to treat unspecified medicinal disorders and for food.

[CFC]
Morphology
Gregarious. Cespitose. Pileus: .5–3.5 cm diam., ovoid to parabolic when young and campanulate when mature; surface light brown-orange, striated on disc to yellow-brown towards margin with fine white granules; margin striated, curved. Context: pale yellow. Hymenophore: attached lamellae, crowded, white when young to blackish-brown when mature, with a grayish margin. Stipe: 2–7 cm long, central, uniform, surface smooth to fibrillose, silky, white to yellowish. Smell: of macerated plants. Taste: not distinctive. Spore print: brownish-black. Spores: subelipsoid, smooth, reddish brown.
Habit
Gregarious, cespitose.
Distribution
Global distribution. Altitude: 1700 – 2600 m a.s.l. Colombian departments: Cundinamarca, Valle del Cauca.
Ecology
Saprotroph. - Undefined saprotroph. Habitat/ecology: on lawns, along sidewalks; in riparian forest and paddock.

[CFC]
Use Food Mushrooms
Part used: Basidiome. Reported as edible in other countries. In Colombia there are no uses reported in this category.
Use Medicines Unspecified Medicinal Disorders
Part used: Basidiome. Used as medicinal in Hong Kong. In Colombia there are no uses reported in this category.

Present in:

Australia, Austria, Belgium, Central European Russia, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Denmark, East European Russia, Eastern Canada, Great Britain, Ireland, North European Russia, North-Central U.S.A., Northeastern U.S.A., Northwest European Russia, Northwestern U.S.A., South European Russia, South-Central U.S.A., Southeastern U.S.A., Southwestern U.S.A., Spain, Sweden, Venezuela, Western Canada

Coprinellus micaceus (Bull.) Vilgalys, Hopple & Jacq. Johnson appears in other Kew resources:

First published in Taxon, 50 (1): 234 (2001)

Literature

Catalogue of Fungi of Colombia

  • Boa, E. (2004). Wild edible fungi: A global overview of their use and importance to people. Non-wood forest products 17. Roma, Italia: FAO. 149 p.
  • Franco-Molano, A. E., & Uribe-Calle, E. (2000) Hongos Agaricales y Boletales de Colombia. Biota Colombiana 1: 25–43.
  • Guzmán, G., & Varela, L. (1978) Hongos de Colombia. III. Observaciones sobre los hongos, liquenes y mixomicetos de Colombia. Caldasia, 12, 309–338.
  • Kuo, M., & Methven, A. S. (2014) Mushrooms of the Midwest. Urbana, USA: University of Illinois Press. 440 p. Recuperado de: http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.uniandes.edu.co:8080/login.aspx?direct=true&db=nlebk&AN=816582&lang=es&site=ehost-live. Consultado en Mayo 20 de 2020.
  • Mata, M. (2003). Macrohongos de Costa Rica Vol 1. Segunda edición. Santo Domingo de Heredia, Costa Rica: Editorial Instituto Nacional de Biodiversidad (Inbio) 257 p.
  • MyCoPortal (2020). Mycology Collections data Portal. Recuperado de: http://mycoportal.org/portal/index.php. Consultado en Mayo- Diciembre 2020.
  • Nguyen, N.H., Song, Z., Bates, S.T., Branco, S., Tedersoo, L., Menke, J., Schilling, J.S. and Kennedy, P.G., 2016. FUNGuild: an open annotation tool for parsing fungal community datasets by ecological guild. Fungal Ecology, 20, pp.241-248.
  • Soto-Medina, E., & Bolaños-Rojas, A. C. (2013). Hongos macroscópicos en un bosque de niebla intervenido, vereda Chicoral, Valle del Cauca, Colombia. Biota Colombiana, 14 (2), 1–12.
  • Vasco-Palacios, A. M., & Franco-Molano, A. E. (2013) Diversity of Colombian macrofungi (Ascomycota - Basidiomycota). Mycotaxon 121: 1-58. http://mycotaxon.com/resources/checklists/VascoPalacios-v121-checklist.pdf

  • Catalogue of Fungi of Colombia

    © Copyright 2021 Useful Plants and Fungi of Colombia http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0
    © Copyright 2021 Index Fungorum Partnership. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0
    https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0